Learn about Fire Opal

fire-opal.jpgWords like "lush" and "vivacious" are often used to describe the fiery variety of Opal, which was once revered by the Mayans and Aztecs, used abundantly in their rituals and art. Their word for Fire Opal was quetzalitzlipyollitli, the "stone of the bird of paradise." After these anciente civilizations went dark, Fire Opal was mostly forgotten about until the mid-1800's, when it began to be mined again in Mexico- where it is now considered that country's national gemstone and where the biggest Fire Opal deposits in the world lie. With a warm, fiery orange-red glow, this gem was obviously named for its color, which comes from fine traces of iron oxide. A relatively soft gemstone, Fire Opal is usually set protectively so it does not get damaged. Despite its relative softness, Fire Opal is thought to bestow courage, stamina, will-power and energy upon she who wears it. 

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